Pre-Pregnancy
Check Up -
Before You Get Pregnant

Our physicians are committed to helping women have the best experience possible when beginning their journey to motherhood.

Pre-Pregnancy Check Up -
Before You Get Pregnant

Our physicians are committed to helping women have the best experience possible when beginning their journey to motherhood.

Before You Get Pregnant

Prior to getting pregnant you should try to be as healthy as possible.  This would include:

  • Eating a healthy well-balanced diet and
  • Establishing a regular exercise program 
  • We also strongly recommend you take a daily prenatal vitamin containing at least 400 micrograms of folic acid
  • Stopping harmful behaviors like smoking, drinking alcohol and using drugs before pregnancy may reduce the risks of some birth defects that occur early in pregnancy
  • Also, you and your partner should avoid travel to areas where the Zika virus is found for at least 3 months prior to trying to get pregnant

Pre-Pregnancy Check Up

We often recommend you come in for a checkup prior to trying to get pregnant. This is especially true if you have medical conditions like diabetes or high blood pressure. 

The goal of this visit is to identify things that could affect your pregnancy.    We will discuss your medical history and prior pregnancies, as well as your family history and medications you take.

pre-pregnancy

Should I be tested for genetic conditions prior to getting pregnant?

We generally recommend that prior to pregnancy you be tested for:

  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Hemoglobinopathies
  • Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)

You may decide to have screening for additional disorders as well including:

  • Fragile X syndrome
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Tay–Sachs disease

Some of these disorders occur more often in certain races or ethnic groups. For example, sickle cell disease occurs most frequently in African Americans. Tay–Sachs disease is most common in people of Eastern or Central European Jewish, French Canadian, and Cajun descent. But anyone can have one of these disorders. They are not restricted to these groups. 

Since your DNA does not change once you have been tested for these conditions you do not need to be retested prior to future pregnancies.

There are now available more expanded genetic testing panels that can test for more than 100 different disorders.  You may want to consider being tested for one of these panels.  No test is perfect. In a small number of cases, test results can be wrong.

Frequently Asked Questions

Obesity during pregnancy is associated with several pregnancy and childbirth complications including:

  • high blood pressure
  • preeclampsia 
  • preterm birth
  • gestational diabetes
  • increased risk of birth injury
  • Increased need for cesarean birth
  • increased risk of birth defects, especiallyneural tube defects.

Excess weight and excess body fat may make it more difficult for us to monitor your fetus with ultrasound exam and to hear the fetus’s heartbeat.

Some medical conditions—such as diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, depression, and seizure disorders—can cause problems during pregnancy. If you have a medical condition, we will discuss with you the changes that you need to make in order to bring your condition under control before you try to get pregnant. 

+ Request Appointment 

Close Menu