Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. This can be caused by a number of factors, including genetics and lifestyle. As many as 1 in 5 pregnancies today are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Women who have had gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies have a 60% chance of developing the disease again. They also have a high likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes later in their life.

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. This can be caused by a number of factors, including genetics and lifestyle. As many as 1 in 5 pregnancies today are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Women who have had gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies have a 60% chance of developing the disease again. They also have a high likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes later in their life.

Gestational Diabetes Risks

A woman with gestational diabetes does not produce enough of her own insulin during pregnancy, causing high blood sugar levels. Gestational diabetes puts newborns at risk for respiratory complications, and it can also cause babies to be born at high birth weights with an increased risk for birth trauma and a higher need for cesarean section.  There is also at increased risk of still birth.

Frequently Asked Questions

Anyone is at risk for developing gestational diabetes.  Therefore, screening is done at 24-28 weeks gestation in all pregnancies. However, if you are at an increased risk for gestational diabetes you may also be asked to be screened early in pregnancy and again at 24-28 weeks.

You can most likely manage gestational diabetes with dietary modifications and careful glucose monitoring. However, you may need medications including possible insulin injections for the duration of your pregnancy.

If you have gestational diabetes, you should have a blood test 6 weeks after you give birth. If your blood sugar is normal, you will need to be tested for diabetes every 1–3 years.

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